Humboldt County COVID-19 Vaccine

null

null

Read IDPH Press Release Here - 1/15/20

null

January 5, 2021 - Top Questions being asked about the COVID-19 Vaccine in Humboldt County.

We are grateful so many people want to be vaccinated and we understand that waiting for the vaccine is extremely difficult right now. Everyone’s opportunity to get vaccinated will come; it will just take some time and patience. In Humboldt County, we will continue to follow the guidance of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), and the Iowa Department of Public Health (IDPH) regarding priority groups, vaccination schedule and any additional guidance that may come forward. As more information becomes available, we promise to keep you informed. Please stay tuned to our sources of communication which include our hospital website, social media, local radio and local newspaper. 

Please take a few minutes to read the top questions being asked about the COVID-19 vaccine in Humboldt County. We hope this will provide clear communication and answers to many of the questions out there. 

Thank you for your continued to support as we continue to fight through the COVID-19 Pandemic. 

Michelle Sleiter, CEO

Joleen Sernett, Humboldt County Public Health Director

Q: Who can get the vaccine today in Humboldt County?
A: CDC is managing the phasing recommendations for each state and within Iowa, the IDPH provides our specific direction. In Phase 1a, healthcare personnel and long term care facility residents are included. This also includes assisted living facilities as well as individuals providing other healthcare services within our county (examples include pharmacists, dentists, school nurses, clergy, social workers, etc.). 

Q: How many doses do we have in Humboldt County?
A: As of today, we have only received one shipment of 300 Moderna vaccines. 240 doses have been given and we expect to use the remaining doses within the next week. 

Q: Why does it take so long to get people vaccinated? 
A: Vaccinating any population is a coordinated effort especially with the vulnerability of this new vaccine. The Moderna vaccine comes with 10 doses in a vial. Once the vial is opened, the remaining doses must be given within 6 hours. As we schedule our vaccination clinics, we must ensure we have 10 individuals scheduled to guarantee no wasted doses of the vaccine. 

Q: Why do healthcare workers get vaccinated before the aged, vulnerable populations?
A: Healthcare personnel continue to be on the front line of the nation’s fight against this deadly pandemic. Healthcare personnel’s race and ethnicity, underlying health conditions, occupation type, and job setting can contribute to their risk of acquiring COVID-19 and experiencing severe outcomes, including death. By providing critical care to those who are or might be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, healthcare personnel have a high risk of being exposed to and getting sick with COVID-19. When healthcare personnel get sick with COVID-19, they are not able to work and provide key services for patients or clients. As of December 3, the day CDC published these recommendations, there were more than 249,000 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 866 deaths among healthcare personnel.

A: As vaccine availability increases, vaccination recommendations will expand to include more populations. CDC has begun making recommendations for Phase 1b and 1c.  Once this is finalized and we are provided direction, we will communicate the specifics and the next steps in getting vaccinated. 

Q: How are the groups chosen for the phases?
A: Because the supply of COVID-19 vaccine in the United States is expected to be limited at first, CDC is providing recommendations to federal, state, and local governments about who should be vaccinated first. CDC’s recommendations are based on recommendations from the ACIP, an independent panel of medical and public health experts.

The recommendations are made with these goals in mind:

  • Decrease death and serious disease as much as possible.
  • Preserve functioning of society.
  • Reduce the extra burden COVID-19 is having on people already facing disparities.

Q: Will there be enough vaccine for everyone?
A: Currently, two vaccines are authorized and recommended to prevent COVID-19 in the United States. It is understandable how concerning this may be for people, especially for those who are at increased risk for serious illness from this virus and for their loved ones.

The goal is for everyone to be able to easily get a COVID-19 vaccine as soon as large quantities are available. That is why, early in the response, the federal government began investing in select vaccine manufacturers to help them increase their ability to quickly make and distribute a large amount of COVID-19 vaccine. This will allow the United States to start with as much vaccine as possible and continually increase the supply in the weeks and months to follow. The goal is for everyone to be able to easily get a COVID-19 vaccine as soon as large quantities are available. Several thousand vaccination providers will be available, including doctors’ offices, retail pharmacies, hospitals, and federally qualified health centers. It is anticipated that everyone will have access to a COVID-19 vaccination by mid-2021.

Q: Can you put me on a waiting list to be notified when I meet the criteria and more vaccine is available? \
A: We are not taking waiting lists or notification lists. You also do not need an appointment for this. Please continue to stay tuned to media outlets to stay informed. These outlets include social media, hospital website, local radio, local newspaper and others that become available.  

Q: What should I do now to help protect myself from COVID-19 since I don’t quality for it yet?
A: Wear a mask when around others, avoid close contact with people who are sick, stay 6 feet away from others, avoid crowds and wash your hands often.

Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine Fact Sheet

Moderna COVID-19 Fact Sheet

A Letter From Dr. Abendroth, Humboldt County Memorial Hospital Emergency Department Medical Director and for Emergency Medical System for Humboldt County

nullnull

Public Notification – December 21, 2020 – Humboldt County COVID-19 Vaccine Has Arrived

We are excited to announce that the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine arrived on Monday, December 21 in Humboldt County. Humboldt County received 300 doses of the vaccine. The first phase of vaccinations will go to healthcare personnel (HCP) and residents and staff of long-term care and assisted living facilities.  This vaccine requires two doses several weeks apart. 

IDPH continues to guide us on what the next phases will look like as the vaccine supply increases.  As soon as this information becomes available, we will share it with you and the appropriate steps to take to get your vaccination.

Until the COVID-19 vaccination becomes readily available for all, please continue to practice all the measures proven to slow the spread of the disease. Wear a mask, keep your 6ft distance, wash your hands, stay home when you are ill and limit your group sizes.  Also take this time to educate yourself from reliable sources on the COVID-19 vaccine and if it is right for you.

This is an historic moment for our community and we are grateful for your support. 

Michelle Sleiter, CEO

Joleen Sernett, Director of Humboldt County Public Health

null
Michelle Sleiter, CEO and Joleen Sernett, Director of Humboldt County Public Health holding the first 300 doses of the Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine
null
Stacy Willard, ADON/MDS Coordinator, Long Term Care receiving the first vaccine in Humboldt County. Vaccine administered by Kassie Wyatt, Restorative/Quality Nurse, Long Term Carenull

Public Notification – December 14, 2020 - Humboldt County COVID-19 Vaccinations

With the recent approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) of the Pfizer COVID-19 Vaccination, we want to share with you what that may mean for Humboldt County. The Iowa Department of Public Health (IDPH) is working alongside our local Public Health department, our hospital and other care facilities to determine the appropriate portion of vaccination needed to treat those deemed most critical in the first phase. At this time, those individuals include healthcare personnel (HCP) and residents and staff of long-term care facilities.  The initial Pfizer allocation of vaccine will not be distributed to Humboldt County at this time. We are scheduled to receive the Moderna COVID-19 Vaccination following the FDA EAU approval currently scheduled for December 17th. If this approval occurs, we have been informed that our first vaccinations in Humboldt County will arrive the week of December 21st. During the next few weeks, we are preparing our team with the resources, tools, and education to be able to provide the vaccination as soon as we receive our first doses.

IDPH continues to guide us on what the next phases will look like as the vaccine supply increases.  As soon as this information becomes available, we will share it with you and the appropriate steps to take to get your vaccination.

Until the COVID-19 vaccination becomes readily available for all, please continue to practice all the measures proven to slow the spread of the disease. Wear a mask, keep your 6ft distance, wash your hands, stay home when you are ill and limit your group sizes.  Also take this time to educate yourself from reliable sources on the COVID-19 vaccine and if it is right for you.

Thank you for you continued support as we get closer to seeing an end to our COVID-19 pandemic.

Michelle Sleiter, CEO

Joleen Sernett, Director of Humboldt County Public Health

Resources:

https://www.humboldthospital.org/news-events/covid-19-update

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/index.html

https://idph.iowa.gov/Emerging-Health-Issues/Novel-Coronavirus/Vaccine

https://www.vaccines.gov/

https://www.immunize.org/

Get vaccinated. Get your smartphone. Get started with v-safe.

V-Safe Information

 

null